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academic1Rules and Regulations

Module Delivery
All modules will be delivered through the English medium. Students will experience a variety of learning methods during these lessons, ranging from lectures to workshops, laboratory sessions, activities, videos, discussions, group work, case studies, mini-projects, questionnaires and surveys, exhibitions, conferences, seminars, industrial visits and other related activities.
Learning Strategy:
  • learning through practical application
  • reference to work-related issues with relevant support materials for learning
  • constant monitoring of students’ progress in knowledge and skills development
  • right application of knowledge and skills to problem solving and contexts
  • practical work-based projects

Textbooks and Stationery

Students are encouraged to purchase a small number of textbooks for the studied programme. Students would also be provided with a list of relevant reference text books which are available from the university’s library. Additionally, students should prepare the following stationery items for use during the programme. Items like A4 size writing paper with lines, pens, pencils, highlighter pens, graph papers, ruler, electronic calculator, ring binders, USB thumb drives and etc.

Information Technology

Throughout the programme students are requires to develop a variety of skills. One of these skills is Applied Technology. Students are to learn about information technology and one of the essential tools is that all students must have access to a computer or laptop. All given assignments are to be properly prepared and presented according to the instruction’s guide book. There are computer facilities available in the university where students can use to complete their assignments or tasks. Although students are to submit their assignments in hardcopy, all students must also keep soft copies of their works and save it in a USB thumb drives or computer or CD.

Lecture / Tutorial Etiquette

These guidelines are given to ensure maximum effectiveness during your study. Please strictly follow them.

  • If you are unable to attend a class/lecture/tutorial/seminar.  You are to inform your lecturer or course administrator in advance
  • Be punctual and arrive on time. Be seated filling seats in the front of the lecture/tutorial theatre or room
  • All types of phones and electronic gadgets must be turned OFF before the start of lecture/tutorial etc.
  • If you are late for class, enter at the back door and be seated as quietly as possible
  • Always remember to bring the module guidebook, relevant lecture notes and handouts, textbooks, and writing materials
  • Lectures are designed to pass on large amounts of information to students in a short period of time. This is part of the learning and personal development process. Your total concentration is essential.
  • Tutorial sessions are designed to help and encourage active learning between students. It helps to develop your social skills and be proactive by taking part in discussions or class activities.
  • No eating of foods or hot drinks is allowed during lecture/tutorial sessions
  • If you need to leave the room during a lecture/tutorial (illness, use the toilet etc.) leave and return as quietly as possible.
  • Make sure that you sign the attendance sheet/log book at every class sessions. This is a confirmation that you have attended the classes.
  • At all times please keep the room tidy and remove all your litters when you leave.

Attendance

During the induction you would be given the timetable schedule and any changes to it you shall be inform duly by the course administrator. Should you not be able to attend any of the lecture/tutorial/seminar you must also inform and let the course administrator know in advance or if necessary to supply written letter or medical certificate.  This is important because if you are found to be absent for more than 30% of the total contact study hours without prior notification. It is a violation of the policy, and it may lead to disciplinary action being taken against you or you may be asked to leave the programme without any refund of fees allowed.

Assignments

Assignments are parts of each module evaluation on students, and are normally given when you have finished certain number of lectures and seminars. There are many types of assignments including essays, case studies, scientific reports or oral presentations.

You can be assessed through class based assignments or outside the classroom assignments.  In general, each of this would follow a particular format.

  • Put you into a role - this is important as it lets you know to whom you are addressing your solutions to the problem. It also requires you to think about how a person in that role would see the problem and use information to solve it.
  • Learning to gather extra information – you are able to develop your skills in using libraries, computer data banks, etc. and correctly indicates the sources of information.
  • To communicate your findings to a particular audience and in a given way
  • To evaluate different solutions to the problem and make appropriate recommendations.

Preparation

Normally, the assignments would be issued early during the beginning part of the semester and your lecturer will advise you on the core topics to be covered. This is to enable you to collect in advance any information you may think that you would need later. Your tutor will also suggest topics to be covered by the assignments. We suggest that you keep a scrapbook to write relevant notes or information, paste magazine cuttings and other suitable items for all modules.

Assessment Schedule

Coursework: Where a module is wholly or partly assessed by coursework, the submission date will be clearly stated on the assessment brief when it is circulated to students. Examination: the Examination Timetables are posted up on notice boards.

Presentation

It is essential that your assignments are well presented if you are to achieve your best results. Your tutor will show you examples of well-presented assignments, but in general, the following points should be considered:

  • Your assignments should be printed.
  • The assignment specification should be attached to your answer.

Submission

An important part for the submission of your assignments for grading is that you must hand in your completed assignments to the course administrator in the office and not to the individual lecturers or tutors. 

Late assignments

If you are unable to complete any assignments by the given due date, you must inform the course administrator in writing. Any request for extension of the submission date for assignments must be forwarded in writing and to fill up the Assessment Extension Form with appropriate reasons and submit five (5) working days in advance prior to the mentioned due date.

Feedback

All graded assignments will be returned to you via the course administrator and not the lecturer concerned. Your lecturer will discuss the results of your assignments individually. However, you are encouraged to raise any questions with regards to the assignments with your lecturer.

Plagiarism

Plagiarism is strictly disallowed. As plagiarism is incorporating unattributed direct quotation or paraphrasing from someone else's work into your own. In fact, it is stealing another's work and passing it off as your own.

You will be given advice by your tutors and within the module guides how to use other people's work (published or unpublished) to support your own arguments and analysis, in writing essays, seminar papers and dissertations.

If you steal words and ideas either from a published author or from a fellow students without proper acknowledgement then you are guilty of intellectual theft. You could find yourself facing an investigating panel and, if you are found guilty, you will be penalized.

Penalties could range from the automatic failure of the whole module to your expulsion from the programme.

Collusion

Collusion is a situation in which two or more students have collaborated to produce a piece of work to be submitted (in whole or in part) for assessment and this is presented as the work of one student alone.

Collusion, which is intended to deceive markers that the work submitted has been independently produced by one student, is a form of cheating, and once identified, will be dealt with as a serious offence. Such collusion, which is intended to give the student concerned an unfair advantage over other students, will thus attract a serious penalty.

There are occasions on which students are encouraged or even required to work together and to produce joint projects or reports, which are then assessed as a joint effort. Sometimes students work together in a group, but produce independent work.

It is extremely important therefore, if you are in any doubt about the appropriateness of group work in the production of assignments, you should ask your lecturer or tutor for clarification.

EXMINATIONS

Tips for Preparation

  • Make sure you are adequately prepared and don't leave your revision until the last minutes.
  • In the last 24 hours, ensure that you are well rested and not too tired to sit for the exam.
  • Ensure that you know where the examination is to be held and that you have everything you need for taking the exam.
  • Arrive at least fifteen minutes earlier to get ready.
  • Try not to listen to any anxious chatter of other students outside the examination hall, it might make you nervous.
  • When you receive the examination paper, make sure that you read the instructions slowly and carefully before you begin to answer.
  • When you know how many questions you are required to answer, determine which question you will attempt first and how long the time to answer each question.
  • Allow 10 minutes at the end of the examination period to check your answers for errors or ambiguity.
  • Read all the questions slowly and carefully so that you are very clear about what is being asked.
  • Answer the question you feel most confident first. This will help you to relax in the examination. Take care not to spend more than the allotted time for answering one question.
  • Always try to answer as many questions as the instructions tell you. It is much harder to achieve enough marks to pass if you omit questions.
  • As we tend to write more important information at the beginning of an answer than at the end, take care not to spend too long on one answer, you may miss out a question because you are short of time.
  • If your mind goes blank don't waste time trying to remember, go on to another question.
  • If you feel anxious,  try to relax by taking long, slow breaths
  • After the examination try not to waste time going over it in your head. There is nothing you can do to alter the result.

Cheating in Examinations

Cheating is interpreted widely as any attempt by a student to gain unfair advantage in an assessment by dishonest means. Cheating includes:

  • Communicating or trying to communicate in any way, with another candidate in an examination
  • Introducing unauthorised materials into an examination (e.g. books and other materials)
  • Obtaining an examination paper in advance prior to the authorised release
  • Stealing another student's essay and passing it off as your own.

Cheating in examination is a very serious offence. Students caught cheating during the examination will be asked to leave the examination room immediately. The invigilator will immediately submit an incident report to the Principal for investigation.

The offending student will be required to appear before the Disciplinary Board if the results of the investigation by the Principal show that an offence has been committed. The Disciplinary Board will make a final decision on the appropriate measures to be taken on the offending student. These measures may include one or a combination of the following:

  • Expulsion from school
  • To re-sit examination
  • Written warning

GENERAL UNIVERSITY RULES AND REGULATIONS

These rules and regulations apply to all students studying at the School at the time this regulation is endorsed until the date it is revised.

Aim

The aims of the rules and regulations are:

  • To create a healthy educational environment.
  • To instil a cooperative relationship between the management and students and between lecturers/tutors and students.
  • To stress the importance of discipline and building right attitude for learning
  • To improve students’ quality.

Dress Code

  • Male students must be in long pants with shirts or T-shirts tucked inside their pants.
  • T-shirts should not have indecent pictures or suggestive slogans.
  • Female students must be dressed in decent attires at all times
  • Female students involved in workshops or field survey works should be in long pants.
  • Students must wear shoes at all times.

The following are strictly NOT ALLOWED:

  • Wearing slippers and sandals.
  • Sleeveless T-shirts (singlet).
  • Track suits for lectures, workshops or field works.
  • Headgears (wearing caps in classrooms and workshops).
  • Shorts (except for outdoor games).

Hair Style

  • Students hair must be neat and tidy.
  • Students must wear their hair in reasonable length.

Discipline

  • Smoking is strictly not permitted anywhere in the building. If you wish to smoke, you must go to the outside of the building.
  • No eating, drinking and listening to music in the classrooms and the students’ resource centre.
  • There must be no littering within the school building.
  • No sleeping in the classrooms
  • No vandalism in the school building
  • No downloading of illegal software and visiting of pornographic websites
  • All mobile phones are to be turned off before entering the classrooms and exam halls
  • All forms of gambling and card games are not allowed
  • Newspapers, all types of magazines and comics are not to be read during lecture hours
  • All students must maintain proper conduct and refrain from unruly behaviour during lectures

Forms of Action and Punishment

The Disciplinary Procedure is used when problems seem to be serious or likely to become serious and would not normally come into operation until the student has failed to respond to advice and warnings of teaching or other staff in the course of their duties.      

Stage 1 -   Verbal warning

When a student's problem is identified, a warning will be given to the student. A Notification of Disciplinary Action Sheet is completed by the course lecturer/tutor to explain why the student has to be disciplined. This Notification must be signed and dated by the lecturer/tutor and student.

Stage 2 -   Interview and Written Warning

Where a student's unacceptable behaviour is serious or persistent, the student will be interviewed, (possibly with a parent present if appropriate) and will be given the opportunity to explain his/her case. Subject to the outcome a Notification of Disciplinary Action, the Course Leader will issue a written warning defining the unacceptable  behaviour after investigation and consultation with the lecturer/tutor and teaching staff responsible for the student.

The written warning will contain the statement that any further unsatisfactory conduct may lead to suspension or dismissal from the school. The student will sign to acknowledge the written warning, which will be filed in the student's record.

Stage 3 -   Suspension or Dismissal

Where misconduct is very serious or has occurred after the issue of a written warning, the student may be immediately suspended from the school normally for up to one week by the Course Leader responsible for the student's course.

The incident and the students’ record will then be reviewed by the Course Leader in consultation with the Principal.

The student will be interviewed within the initial suspension period where they will be given the opportunity to put their side of the case and they may be accompanied by a parent, guardian or other suitable advisor.

Formal dismissal of a student (expulsion) will only occur after the circumstances of the case have been reported to and approved by both the Principal and the Director of International Co-operation. The student will be informed of their right to appeal against the dismissal.

An appeal against dismissal must be addressed to the Director and received within 21 days of the date of dismissal.

Note. Certain misdemeanours will be considered sufficiently serious to be classified as Gross Misconduct and dismissal may result from the Stage 3 procedure without the previous issue of a verbal or written warning. In such cases police will be informed and necessary action will be taken. Offences in this category include:

  • Physical assault on students or staff
  • Racial or Sexual harassment
  • Theft
  • Wilful damage to school property or equipment.
  • Drug related matters

Safety Rules

  • Student must comply with the safety guidelines and must handle the safety equipment properly.
  • Students who damage or destructs schools property (such as breaking of furniture, electrical fittings, plumbing facilities and fire-fighting appliances) shall assume full liability to pay the costs of repairs. The School is not liable for any injuries. In serious cases, the assistance of the police will be sought.

Learning Methods

Module Delivery

All modules will be delivered through the English medium. Students will experience a variety of learning methods during these lessons, ranging from lectures to workshops, laboratory sessions, activities, videos, discussions, group work, case studies, mini-projects, questionnaires and surveys, exhibitions, conferences, seminars, industrial visits and other related activities.

Learning Strategy:

  • learning through practical application
  • reference to work-related issues with relevant support materials for learning
  • constant monitoring of students’ progress in knowledge and skills development
  • right application of knowledge and skills to problem solving and contexts
  • practical work-based projects

The delivery of the modules will be scheduled except for take home assignment, where the students are expected to make their own schedule. The contact hours ranges from about 15 to 21 hours per week (Refer respective modules schedule). Independent learning time is given to allow students to do their own research.

Schedule

  • The schedules distributed by the school shall reflect the dates and timing for the modules/units that you have been enrolled.
  • All the students are to adhere the given schedules for the respective modules/units.
  • Students are to be punctual for their lessons and those who are late for more than 10 minutes will be considered absent (if without a valid reason).
  • Break time for classes is 5 minutes to 10 minutes. Return to class punctually after the break.

Textbooks and Stationery

Students are encouraged to purchase a small number of textbooks for the studied programme. Students would also be provided with a list of relevant reference text books which are available from the university’s library. Additionally, students should prepare the following stationery items for use during the programme. Items like A4 size writing paper with lines, pens, pencils, highlighter pens, graph papers, ruler, electronic calculator, ring binders, USB thumb drives and etc.

Information Technology

Throughout the programme students are requires to develop a variety of skills. One of these skills is Applied Technology. Students are to learn about information technology and one of the essential tools is that all students must have access to a computer or laptop. All given assignments are to be properly prepared and presented according to the instruction’s guide book. There are computer facilities available in the university where students can use to complete their assignments or tasks. Although students are to submit their assignments in hardcopy, all students must also keep soft copies of their works and save it in a USB thumb drives or computer or CD.

TOP TIPS TO YOUR STUDIES

You will (eventually) develop an understanding of what is required in the HND course. The following lists of effective and practical techniques to excel in studies:

  • You must attend every class sessions, especially if it is a subject you find difficult.
  • Seminars, tutorials and labs are important. You must attend all seminars, tutorials and labs sessions, which are arranged for you.
  • Read up before attending classes. This can help you to keep track of what is being taught in class.
  • Complete the tutorial sheets. These are the problems which you are expected to work through as ‘homework’. Examples will be shown by the tutors.
  • Get to know your lecturers and ask for help as soon as you need it. Be prepared to ask questions in class. Get yourself noticed for all the right reasons. If you have a problem, get help as soon as possible from the lectures and tutors.
  • Start on your assignment as soon as you are given. Do not put off to a later date, as there will be many assignments to be done.
  • Read up after every lecture and do your own research on all subject areas. It will certainly benefit you in the sense that you have more information and broader understanding on the subject.
  • Work with other students to share ideas and gain mutual support. Studying with others makes study more interesting, as you can gain a different set of perspectives and learning knowledge.
  • Most assignments have a word limit. Use it as a guideline when writing your assignments. Plan out your assignments in advance on how you would structure your reports and the total number of words to be used. Often, you need to be concise and precise about each topic.
  • Plan your time well and take a break when you feel tired.